First World War on the Home front

"Your country Needs YOU!" was the poster slogan that shouted out to many during the First World War. And indeed, it did. As men of all ages joined the Forces and left their homes and jobs, so those left behind were forced to step up and take their place. Food shortages, rationing, the "First Blitz" and the appearance of women in the workplace all became familar. Drawing on the archives of the Imperial War Museum, author Terry Charman presents a lively portrait of life on the Home Front in the First World War. Filled with absorbing first-hand accounts taken from diaries, letters and newspaper reports, the changing life in Britain between 1914 and 1918 is revealed in vivid and immensely personal detail by the people who actually lived through it. From the draconian effects of DORA (Defence of the Realm Act) to the threat of Zeppelin raids, to government propaganda and the power of the press, The First World War on the Home Front recalls how the people of Britain not only faced up to the threats to their country but also prepared for the fact that life in Britain would never be the same.

Author Bio

Terry Charman is the Senior Historian at the Imperial War Museum, where he has worked since 1974. He is a frequent lecturer on the First and Second World Wars and has contributed to magazines and journals on a range of related topics. He is the author of The German Home Front 1939-45 and Outbreak: The World Goes to War. He has also acted as a consultant on films and TV and radio documentaries and programmes, such as Foyle's War and Schindler's List. He lives in Tunbridge Wells.

CHARMAN (Terry), First World War on the Home Front, London, Andre Deutsch publishers, 2015. Out on 10/09/2015.  In collaboration with the Imperial War Museum

Carlton Publishing Group 

First World War remembered

 

The First World War was one of the seminal events of the twentieth century. The savagery of the fighting, the appalling conditions endured by the soldiers, and the sheer scale of the carnage have seared images of the War into the public memory: trenches, barbed wire, machine guns, artillery, and enormous cemeteries. Millions of men fought in the trenches, many died, and many more were maimed in mind or body. This book shows the wide sweep of the conflict, describing the development of the fighting from 1914-1918, spotlighting some of the obscure but important actions as well as the major battles and the soldiers who fought them.

Author Bio

Professor Gary Sheffield is Chair of War Studies at the University of Wolverhampton, having previously taught the University of Birmingham and King's College, London. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Arts and has written widely on twentieth-century military history especially the First World War. In 2003, he shared the Templer Medal for Military Literature for his contribution to The British General Staff: Innovation and Reform (2002). Gary regularly broadcasts on radio and television, and his work has appeared in the Guardian, the Mail on Sunday, the Times Literary Supplement and BBC History Magazine. He lives in Oxfordshire.

SHEFFIELD (Gary), IWM First World War remembered, London, Andre Deutsch publishers, s.d. In collaboration with the Imperial War Museum

Carlton Publishing Group

Western front experience, 1914 - 1918

 

Ninety years after the Armistice of 1918, we are still fascinated with the First World War. The Western Front Experience describes the development of the fighting from 1914-1918, spotlighting some of the obscure but important actions and as well as the major battles. From the appalling conditions endured by the soldiers in the trenches, to the generals in their headquarters, this book combines a vivid narrative informed by recent research, and brings to life one of the most terrible periods of warfare the world has ever known. It also includes: diaries, letters and telegrams; maps, plans and orders; and propaganda and posters.

Author Bio

Professor Gary Sheffield was appointed Chair of War Studies at the University of Birmingham in 2006, having previously taught as a Professor of Modern History at King's College, London. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Society of Arts and has written widely on twentieth-century military history especially the First World War. In 2003, he shared the Templer Medal for Military Literature for his contribution to The British General Staff: Innovation and Reform (2002). Gary regularly brodcasts on radio and television, and his work has appeared in the Independent, the Independent on Sunday, the Guardian, the Mail on Sunday, the Times Literary Supplement and BBC History Magazine. He lives in Birmingham.

SHEFFIELD (Gary), Imperial War Museum: The Western Front experience (1914-1918), London, Andre Deutsch publishers, 2008 In collaboration with the Imperial War Museum

Carlton Publishing Group

First World War for children

The story of the First World war for children 1914-1918

The First World War was the world's first 'total war'. Although large- scale wars like the Napoleonic wars had ranged across many territories, the scale of the First World War was unprecedented. It was also the first war between modern, industrialised nations and mechanised warfare saw new and terrifying weapons deployed for the first time, including airplanes, tanks, zeppelins, giant warships and poison gas. Now, on the verge of the centenary of the start of the First World War, this fact-packed information book relates the unfolding events and the human stories in a way that brings history vividly to life.

Author Bio

John Malam is a children's author specializing in non-fiction. He has written more than 200 books including many history titles. John is a National Literacy Trust Reading Champion, recognised for his work in encouraging reading amongst young people, particularly boys. He has a background in history and archaeology and lives in Cheshire, England.

MALAM (John), IWM The story of the First World War for children, 1914 - 1918, London, Andre Deutsch publishers, 2014

Carlton publishing group

Gallipoli, 25 April 1915 - 9 January 1916

Gallipoli

To mark the passing of a hundred years since the Gallipoli campaign, the publishers Andre Deutsch have produced a fine centenary edition book entitled "Gallipoli, 25 April 1915 - 9 January 1916". Jointly written by Major General Julian Thompson (RM), Dr Peter Pederson and Dr Haluk Oral, the authors describe the roles of Britain, Australia and Turkey in the campaign and outline its legacy for their respective nations. "Gallipoli provides a record of events in an accessible format, covering planning and preparation stages, landings and key battles (on land and at sea), and the withdrawal of Allied forces. Profiles are provided of key figures from both sides. The failure of military leaders is well documented, as is the desperate fighting ashore and the dreadful living conditions endured by the troops, many of them Anzacs (soldiers of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps). Following the spring landings the onset of hot summer weather brought with it flies, liçce and dysentery. The horrific nature of the fighting is graphically conveyed  in "Gallipoli". The book also tells the story of how the Royal Marines endured, for the Plymouth, Chatham and Portsmouth battalions of the Royal Marine Light Infantry (RMLI) - plus the RN Nelson battalion - supported the UK's 157th Brigade. A chapter is also devoted to the naval campaign, recording the activities of British and French warships that played a key role in supporting and sustaining troops ashore. Other chapters tell of the contribution provided by the Royal Naval Air Service, and that of the British and Australian submarines in the Dardanelles.

Despite its modest 64 pages this is a large book. It comes in a sturdy hardback sleeve, the whole package designed and presented in the style of a souvenir volume. It packs into its sepia-toned pages around 136 quality photographs and 17 maps. It could be said every picture (definitely) tells a story. More maps are included in three envelopes tucked away in the book, which also contain reproductions of miscellaneous historical documents. Among them are a sketch of the landing places, plans of action, orders, an artist's pencil sketch of a warship and a letter written by an officer to his wife decribing the brutal fighting. "Gallipoli" makes a handsome commemoration of a highly controversal episode in WW1. Well designed, it offers an attractive and easy-to-read means of getting to grips with a complex subject.

Author Bio

Major General Julian Thompson CB OBE served in the Royal Marines for 34 years and commanded the Royal Marine Commandos and the two battalions of the Parachute Regiment during the Falklands War. Since retiring, he has been a visiting professor at King's College, London. He has written a number of books, including Carlton's The 1916 Experience and The Second World War in 100 Objects.

Dr Peter Pedersen is an expert in Australian military history. He was a Senior Historian and Head of the Research Centre at the Australian War Memorial. He has written six books on the First World War and frequently appears on television and radio.

Professor Haluk Oral is a Turkish historian. He studied at Instanbul University and Bogaziçi University in Turkey and Simon Fraser University in Canada. He now lecturers at Bogaziçi University. He has written a number of books, including ANZAC 1915 and Gallipoli 1915.

Major general THOMPSON (Julian) RM, Dr PEDERSON (Peter) and Dr ORAL (Haluk), Gallipoli, 25 April 1915 - 9 January 1916, London, Andre Deutsch publishers, 2015.

Review written by ANDREWS Dennis, published in Warships_International_Fleet_Review_july_2015

Lusitania resource

Lusitania100Cork-logo-950-wpcf 950x350This site is dedicated to the passenger ship RMS Lusitania and her passengers and crew, the ship whose sinking altered the course of the First World War. On this site you will find facts and history relating to the steamship RMS Lusitania and the Lusitania sinking, as well as the passenger and crew lists and biographies of people on board when the ship was torpedoed on 7 May 1915.

 

The Lusitania resource

1915 - Second Battle of Ypres Gas! / Dream Castles

On April 22, 1915 had for the first time in history a large gas attack instead. Between Steenstraat and Langemarck chlorine gas drifted on the breeze from the German line of French troops who were not protected against it. There were more than a thousand deaths and nearly broke the Allied front bow at Ypres. It was the start of a month long bloody battle in which five gas attacks took place and who brought the Allied front to less than 4 km from the city center. The civilian population was forced to leave the city. Later, all this called the Second Battle of Ypres. In the next 27 months 'small' Ypres Salient remained a constant threat, and the city was almost completely shot to rubble.

Before the war Ypres was not only known as a medieval city. In the area where she met many castles and manors with extensive domains. In the first year of the war many of them were involved in the war. They were destroyed because the front ran through the domain, whether they were used as headquarters, as medical aid station or camp. For most of these areas, the war meant an end to a glorious time. Some were repaired, others rebuilt, but most changed for good countenance or destination. Some of today is nothing more than a bunch to find. Or just the name of a war cemetery to honor their glorious existence.

The historic double exhibition in 1915, the Second Battle of Ypres and Dream Castles? brings these tragic events uniquely reminder. Unprecedented visuals, insightful charts, iconic objects and documents illustrate the second year of the war of the century memorial to Ypres and the front area. At the same time the second part of the exhibition is an introduction to three other exhibitions castle domains of the region in Heuvelland (Kemmel), Zonnebeke and Poperinge (The Lovie).

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